Woman killed in downtown Seattle shooting on Wednesday identified


By

Project Homeless engagement editor

When Tanya Jackson left her home on Cedar Street on Wednesday, she turned to a staff member on duty in her building and grinned.

“She said ‘Bye’ and she had a great big smile on her face,” said Kelli Larsen, chief program officer at Plymouth Housing, who was told of the exchange by one of her staff members.

Later that day, Jackson, 50, was shot and killed blocks away in downtown Seattle, the only person to die after a mass shooting at Third Avenue and Pine Street that began around 5 p.m. Seven others were injured, including another Plymouth Housing client and a 9-year-old boy, who was released from Harborview Medical Center on Friday afternoon.

The Seattle Times’ Project Homeless is funded by BECU, The Bernier McCaw Foundation, The Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, Campion Foundation, the Paul G. Allen Family Foundation, Raikes Foundation, Schultz Family Foundation, Seattle Foundation, Starbucks and the University of Washington. The Seattle Times maintains editorial control over Project Homeless content.

The King County Medical Examiner’s Office identified Jackson on Friday afternoon.

Plymouth Housing was working to contact Jackson’s family members when the news was first released, said Amanda Vail, communications director for Plymouth.

For almost a decade, Jackson had found a home with Plymouth Housing, a homeless-services provider in Seattle that connects the most vulnerable people living outside with a permanent place to live.

Jackson had a reputation among the staff members who managed her building, A.L. Humphrey House in the Belltown neighborhood, as always being joyful.

“People are really feeling it,” Larsen said. Jackson’s building manager took the day off from work.

For every resident who dies at Plymouth, a memorial service is held. Vail said that will be the case for Jackson, but she was unsure when.



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Aurora Historical Society plans memorial exhibit on Henry Pratt mass shooting


A visitor looks at the crosses for the victims of the Feb. 15, 2019, mass shooting in Aurora that were display at the David L. Pierce Art and History Center downtown last spring. The Aurora Historical Society is putting together a new memorial exhibit about the shooting that will open in early February. (Aurora Historical Society / HANDOUT)



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Several feared dead in mass shooting in Germany


BERLIN

Several people have been feared dead after a shooting incident in the southern German town of Rot am See on Friday, according to local media.

The daily Bild reported that a gunman opened fire on a group of people and killed six members of a family.

Police confirmed on Twitter that a suspect was arrested soon after the incident.

“According to the first findings, it appears to be a relationship dispute,” it said.



Anadolu Agency website contains only a portion of the news stories offered to subscribers in the AA News Broadcasting System (HAS), and in summarized form. Please contact us for subscription options.



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State lawmakers respond to deadly Seattle mass shooting


For Democratic Senator Patty Kuderer, last night’s shooting was personal. “It’s horrible, she texted me and said there was a shooting and then I couldn’t reach her for a while. Until they reconnected, Sen. Kuderer thought she was going to be one of those who lost their loved ones to gun violence.



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Slog PM: We’re 100 Seconds from the End of the World, Four Mass Shooting Victims Released from Haborview – Slog


Wednesday’s mass shooting outside a downtown Seattle McDonald’s injured seven people and killed another. Photo by Karen Ducey/Getty Images

Downtown shooting updates: One of the three suspects has been booked into jail. At a press conference today, Mayor Durkan said that “if this had been a fistfight, eight people would not have ended up at the hospital,” referring to the need for increased gun safety. There’s also talk of shutting down that McDonald’s, located right where the dispute took place. Here are the conditions of the victims, per Seattle Times:

Four of the seven people injured had been treated and released from Harborview as of Wednesday afternoon, officials said. [I assume they mean Thursday. The shooting was Wednesday evening —Chase.] Those who remained hospitalized were recovering: A woman in her 50s who initially had been in critical condition and the 9-year-old boy, who was initially in serious condition, had been upgraded, according to the hospitals. A 32-year-old man was in satisfactory condition.

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And here’s today’s press conference:

Is a mass shooting good for business? Riders are fuming over how expensive Lyft and Uber rides were last night due to the traffic congestion resulting from the mass shooting. A $46 ride from downtown to Fremont? Jesus. “I didn’t know how to get home, and I felt like I was getting taken advantage of in a really bad situation,” said one rider to the Seattle Times. The companies say they plan on reimbursing people who were affected by the spike.

Do you want to buy a Washington state ferry? It can be yours for $100,000. Free local pickup!

The Senate impeachment trial dragged on for its third day today: Thursday has mostly been dedicated to addressing the first article of impeachment, and highlights include discussing whether criminal conduct needs to have happened for impeachment, someone actually made a joke, and then the Democrats used Trump’s words against him while discussing the Bidens. All that aside, many of today’s stories revolved around…

The senators can’t stop wiggling: They would like you to know they’re VERY RESTLESS. “We’re doing our best,” said Senator Kevin Cramer to the New York Times. “With each break and with each disruption if you will, to the sitting in the chair, there becomes a little less discipline.” More:

Despite impeachment trial rules that require them to sit silently at their desks when the proceeding is in session, senators have increasingly been wandering out for short or long breaks, to accommodate bathroom stops, telephone calls, and even cable television appearances. On Thursday afternoon, as the Democratic impeachment managers took turns speaking during their second full day of presentations, at least 19 senators could briefly be seen out of their seats.

Some rose from their chairs and crossed the chamber to whisper to one another, while others exited the chamber entirely for 15- to 20-minute stretches and could be seen in the cloakrooms on their phones.

These stories drive me nuts. Drink some energy water or something you dingbats.

If you’re not restless, here’s the livestream: It’s still going.

The White House and Trump administration is getting flack for broadcasting a sermon on their YouTube channel that claimed homosexuality is created by demons. Mike Pence was attending the sermon. “We have to encourage young men and women to get married,” said the church’s bishop. “It’s a demonic spirit that causes a woman to want to lie with another woman. It’s a demonic spirit that causes a man to be attracted to another man.” Here’s the sermon, if you’re somehow interested:

BUREAUCRATIC TYRANNY REIGNS: University Street Station is officially changing to… “Union Street/Symphony Station.” Sound Transit is an embarassment. Read Rich Smith on this whole disaster.

New updates to the ongoing digital political ad drama in Washington state: Facebook is WILD. A thread from Stranger associate editor Eli Sanders:

The $629 billion company also says it “neither admits nor denies” that numerous political ads it sold in Washington state failed to follow long-standing political ad disclosure requirements.https://t.co/tTzLqzsRyK
— Eli Sanders (@elijsanders) January 23, 2020

Back-story here:https://t.co/4iKoxIDxob
— Eli Sanders (@elijsanders) January 23, 2020

And the results…

How about the insufficient fine?
— Mike Selhorn (@selhorn) January 23, 2020

What’s better: Little Ting’s Dumplings or Buerjia Chinese Sauerkraut Fish? Eater has a list of 15 of Seattle’s best Chinese restaurants. I want that sauerkraut fish.

Should Washington state ban private prisons? A new report from Crosscut details how Washington state legislators are considering a private prison ban similar to the one passed in California (which was then sued). “We should not be profiting off our most vulnerable communities. Locking people up should not be a moneymaking venture,” commented Rep. Lillian Ortiz-Self.

Love Slog AM/PM? Want to support The Stranger? Contribute here.

Mike Bloomberg plans on opening TEN offices in Washington state: He’s also hired some impressive campaign staffers for the state. Who’s voting for Bloomberg? I’m going to ban you from this blog if you vote for Bloomberg.

Amazon continues to quibble over Microsoft winning the $10 billion, 10-year cloud “JEDI” Pentagon contract: Amazon has now “filed a motion Wednesday asking a federal judge to block Microsoft from working on any substantive tasks for the JEDI project while the court considers the matter,” writes Monica Nickelsburg at GeekWire. Amazon is in the middle of a legal battle over the contract, claiming the defense department ultimately chose Microsoft because of the President’s “political bias” against Jeff Bezos and the Washington Post.

And, lastly, it is about to be the end of the world: Metaphorically speaking. Or perhaps literally. I guess that’s up to all of us. The Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists has inched the Doomsday Clock up to 100 seconds to midnight, which is “a metaphor for the end of the world… in a recognition of growing threats from nuclear war, climate change, and disinformation,” writes the Washington Post. “It is the first time the clock has passed the two-minute mark in more than 70 years of existence, a testament to the need for urgent action.”

The hands on the #DoomsdayClock were just moved to 100 seconds to midnight – 20 seconds closer to its previous setting. pic.twitter.com/Lhuj8d1A7F
— Jesse Horne (@Jesse_Horne) January 23, 2020





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Police release horrific details of the 1st mass shooting of the year, identify teen suspect


The teen allegedly killed four of his family members one by one, police said.

January 23, 2020, 8:54 PM

6 min read

The first mass shooting in the country this year was allegedly carried out by a 16-year-old, who skipped school to kill each of his family members as they returned home, prosecutors said.

Colin Jeffrey “CJ” Haynie is being charged as an adult for killing his mother and his three siblings as well as for the attempted killing of his father, said Tooele County Attorney Scott Broadhead.

Haynie provided brief details to police when he was taken into custody on Jan. 17 at a local hospital.

High School girls stand together at a candlelight vigil for the Haynie family at City Park in Grantsville, Utah, Jan. 20, 2020.

High School girls stand together at a candlelight vigil for the Haynie family at City Park in Grantsville, Utah, Jan. 20, 2020.Spenser Heaps/The Deseret News via AP

Authorities were able to gather details about the incident that shocked the Grantsville, Utah, community through witness interviews and his father’s statements. The murders were the first in the town — where the population is 11,568, according to the 2018 U.S. Census Bureau — in almost 20 years, officials said.

“The defendant stated that he had killed his mother first at about 1 p.m. He then stated that he killed the others as they returned home,” said Broadhead at a press conference on Wednesday.

Consuelo Alejandra Haynie picked up her 12-year-old daughter Maylan from school that day and were gunned down when they walked inside the house. The 52-year-old mom’s son allegedly used a handgun to shoot them in the head, necks and/or upper bodies, Broadhead said.

An hour passed as Colin Haynie sat in their home when 15-year-old Alexis came home from school. Officials said he shot his sister in the head and upper body between 2 p.m. and 5:17 p.m. when 14-year-old Matthew arrived at the house.

Colin Haynie allegedly killed his younger brother execution style with a single bullet to the head, the prosecutor said.

Photographs of Consuelo Alejandra Haynie, 52, right, and three of her children, 12-year-old Maylan, 14-year-old Mathew, and 15-year-old Alexis Haynie, left to right, are displayed at a candlelight vigil for the Haynie family at City Park in Grantsville, Utah, Jan. 20, 2020.

Photographs of Consuelo Alejandra Haynie, 52, right, and three of her children, 12-year-old Maylan, 14-year-old Mathew, and 15-year-old Alexis Haynie, left to right, are displayed at a candlelight vigil for the Haynie family at City Park in Grantsville, Utah, Jan. 20, 2020.Spenser Heaps/The Deseret News via AP

His father was shot in the leg when he returned home around 6:15 p.m. before struggling with his son and ripping the gun out of his hands, prosecutors said.

Colin Haynie told investigators at the hospital that his son allegedly told him that “his mother and other siblings were dead and that his intention was to kill everyone in the house except himself.”

An online fundraiser for the father’s medical costs and funeral expenses surpassed its goal of $100,000 as of Thursday afternoon. Official funeral arrangements have not been announced.

Police investigate after four people were killed and fifth person was injured in a shooting at a Grantsville, Utah, home, Jan. 17, 2020. The suspected shooter was taken into custody by Grantsville police, the Deseret News reported. Grantsville Mayor Brent Marshall said the victims and the shooter are all related, the newspaper reported.

Police investigate after four people were killed and fifth person was injured in a shooting at a Grantsville, Utah, home, Jan. 17, 2020. The suspected shooter was taken into custody by Grantsville police, the Deseret News reported. Grantsville Mayor Brent Marshall said the victims and the shooter are all related, the newspaper reported.The Deseret News via AP, FILE

The juvenile suspect has been charged with four counts of aggravated murder, one count of attempted murder and five counts of felony discharge of a firearm in Third District Court in Tooele County.

The maximum penalty for aggravated murder is life in prison without parole.

The investigation is still ongoing, authorities said.



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Keeping guns away from potential mass shooters | MSUToday


The United States currently averages 20 mass shootings per year. Researchers from Michigan State University measured the extent to which mass shootings are committed by domestic violence perpetrators, suggesting how firearm restrictions may prevent these tragedies.

Under federal law, when people are convicted of domestic violence misdemeanor crimes, they are prohibited from purchasing and possessing guns for the rest of their lives. However, holes in the system allow potential mass shooters to slip through the cracks.

“We found that 38% of known mass shooters had a history of domestic violence, either known to the justice system or mentioned in the media,” said April Zeoli, associate professor of criminal justice at MSU and lead author of the research. “Very few of those who committed mass shootings seemed to have firearm restrictions due to domestic violence; the fact that some of them had those restrictions suggests that we are not actually preventing purchase or possession of a gun as well as we could or need to be.”

Zeoli explained that some cases of domestic violence never result in firearm restrictions because law enforcement is never involved, because the cases were not referred to prosecutors, because the charges that were filed didn’t qualify for firearm restrictions or because the case didn’t meet a relationship requirement for the gun restrictions to be applied.

“In more than 20 states, a person convicted of misdemeanor domestic violence against a dating partner will not be restricted from firearm access – you must have lived together, be married or have a child together to qualify for the restriction,” Zeoli said.

The research, published in Criminology & Public Policy, looked at the nearly 90 mass shootings that took place between 2014 and 2017. Zeoli and co-author Jennifer Paruk cross-checked four separate mass shooting databases – compiled by Every Town for Gun Safety, USA Today, Gun Violence Archives and Mother Jones – and then used publicly available criminal records to see what other criminal charges the shooters had against them.

“The public sees media reports of mass shootings happening in movie theaters, schools, night clubs and beyond – these are the ones that keep us all up at night,” Zeoli said. “But the majority of these mass shootings involved intimate and family member victims.”

The researchers pinpointed ways – called “exit points” in the paper – that firearm restrictions failed to prevent a shooter from buying a gun, which include purchases made through private sales and a failure to report gun disqualifications to the criminal background check system.

“In the case of the Sutherland Springs Baptist church shooting, the shooter did in fact qualify for a gun restriction under federal law because of domestic violence,” Zeoli said. “However, the conviction was in military court, and the military never sent the conviction records to the background check system; so, when he went to buy a gun, nothing showed up on his record.”

Zeoli hopes that the findings inspire both the public and lawmakers to learn about their states’ laws, as well as the exit points she and Paruk found that can lead to a gun landing in the hands of the wrong type of person.

“The image you get of mass shootings in the media isn’t always the full picture,” Zeoli said. “People should determine, in their state, whether it may be possible for people convicted of domestic violence to obtain a firearm. Many of those exit points can be closed through legislation and better implementation of the law. My feeling – and my hope – is that we’ll continue to see states work to implement restrictions to dangerous individuals from gaining access to guns and prevent gun violence from happening.”

(Note for media: Please include a link to the original paper in online coverage: https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/1745-9133.12475)



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Trial begins for three men accused of 2013 Fox Hill mass shooting – EyeWitness News


NASSAU, BAHAMAS – The trial of three men accused of killing four people and wounding seven others during a 2013 mass drive-by shooting at Freedom Park, Fox Hill, began yesterday.

Jermaine Curry, Peter Rolle and Justin Williams appeared before Supreme Court Justice Deborah Fraser.

The trio have been charged with four counts of murder for the shooting death of Claudezino Davis, Shaquille Demeritte, Eric Morrison and Shenique Sands on December 27, 2013.

The trio has also been charged for the attempted murder against Chino Davis, Janet Davis, John Davis, Benjamin Demeritte, Samuel Ferguson, Jermaine Pratt and Leroy Taylor, on the same day.

According to reports, a crowd of people were gathered on the park awaiting Junkanoo results, when the occupants of a small dark vehicle opened fire “with a variety of weapons” in the area just behind the basketball court shortly before 6pm.

Curry is being represented by attorney Murrio Ducille, Rolle is represented by Sonia Timothy, and Williams is represented by Geoffrey Farquharson.

In its opening statement, the prosecution, lead by Roger Thompson and Zoey Gibson, warned the jury not to let “anyone or anything influence you.”

Gibson told the court that the prosecution will prove its case through the evidence presented in the witness block.

The court is expected to hear testimonies from witnesses on the park during the time of the incident, officers who dealt with the case, family members of the diseased, and one of the four people who were in the vehicle with the accused.

The prosecution called its first witness, Corporal Navar Neely, a crime scene investigator.

Neely told the court that on 9:30 a.m. on December 28, he was instructed by his superior to process a four-door Honda in the parking lot of the Central Detective Unit.

The right-hand drive vehicle was registered to Maxwell and Eric Culmer Curry, Neely said. 

He noted that upon checking the vehicle he discovered that the ignition appeared to be damaged; part of the ignition was in the driver’s door; there was screwdriver in the back seat area; there were several sunglasses in different areas of the vehicle; and there were a number of fired cartridge casings of different calibers observed in different areas of the vehicle.

He said he also found bullet fragments in the interior of the car.

Neely said the items were collected, packaged and labeled.

He testified that he also processed the vehicle for latent fingerprints.

Neely told the court he discovered 17 latent impressions found on various aspects of the vehicle, which were photographed, lifted and handed over for analysis.

He said the cartridge casings discovered, among of which were 9 mm and .223 casings, were also handed over to be examined for ballistics.

Jury members heard that photographs of the vehicle were taken, downloaded onto a compact disk and bound into albums – each one labeled and signed by Neely, along with the disk.

Ducille and Farquharson objected at length over the witness’ explanation of how the photos were transferred to the disk from the camera via USB or SD card.

However, Justice Fraser allowed both the photo albums and disk into exhibit.

During cross examination, Ducille asked Neely whether he found any unfired bullets in the vehicle and whether he took any latent prints of the cases discovered.

The corporal advised that he did not recall finding any unfired cartridges, adding that he did not fingerprint those he did recover.

Neely told the court that this could not be done because it would have possibly interfered with the integrity of the ballistics.

When asked by Ducille which parts of the vehicles the fingerprints were found, Neely listed the rear right glass, front right glass, left fender, interior handles of the vehicle, rearview mirror, visor mirror and one of the sunglasses recovered.

Neely later noted that while he took prints from the exterior handles of the car, no fingerprints were found.

Ducille also asked the witness whether any of the fingerprints belonged to Jermaine Curry.

However, Neely noted that he was unable to answer this question because he only serves as a “fingerprint custodian”, who passes the prints on to be examined.

When questioned by Farquharson, Neely was presented with several scenarios under which the vehicle could have been “tampered with” and asked whether they made “probative sense with the evidence presented”.

Farquharson suggested that the ignition of the vehicle and ignition part found in the driver’s door were not from the same vehicle (the latter being a push to start key) and furthered that the vehicle was “tampered by someone who wanted to make it look like someone stole the car”.

Neely however was unable to follow the line of questioning by the veteran attorney.

After several attempts to rephrase the question, Farquharson pointed to the term “garbage in, garbage out”, and added “If you do a sloppy investigation, you are going to come out will worthless evidence.”

Neely’s cross examination continues today at 12pm.



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At least one killed, several injured in Seattle mass shooting



At least one killed, several injured in Seattle mass shooting&nbsp | &nbspPhoto Credit:&nbspThinkstock

At least one person was killed and seven others, including a child, were wounded on Wednesday after gunfire broke out in downtown Seattle near a popular tourist area, police and hospital officials said. Police said at least one suspect was being sought in connection with the mass shooting that took place near a McDonald’s fast food restaurant, just blocks away from the Pike Place Market.

It was the third shooting in the area in less than two days, and the latest incident of gun violence that has affected churches, cinemas and other public places in the United States.

“Officers investigating shooting near 4th and Pine,” the Seattle Police Department said in a tweet. “Multiple victims. The suspect has fled, and police are searching for him. Officers and medics are providing first aid to the injured.”

Police chief Carmen Best told reporters at the scene that one person, a woman, had been killed and several others were wounded in the shooting that occurred shortly after 5:00 pm (0100 GMT).

Officials at Harborview Medical Center, where all the wounded were transported, said seven people were being treated at the hospital, including a nine-year-old boy.

Police ordered people to stay out of the area and shut down a subway station as they searched for one or more suspects.

Tyler Parsons, an employee at Victrola Coffee Roasters, told The Seattle Times that he was working when he suddenly saw victims falling to the ground as shots rang out.

He said several people ran into his shop to seek cover and he saw two people with gunshot wounds.

“The shooting was just kind of terrifying. Terrifying it’s so close,” he told the paper.

One body covered with a white tarp could be seen in TV images lying on the sidewalk in front of the McDonald’s two hours after the shooting.

It was unclear if any of the victims were tourists.

Susan Gregg, a spokesperson for Harborview Medical Center, said a 55-year-old woman shot in the abdomen was rushed into surgery and the boy, who was shot in the leg, was in serious condition. The other victims — five males — are in satisfactory condition, she said.

Gregg added that the nature of the injuries varied from grazing wounds to life-threatening injuries.

One witness interviewed by local media said he had seen two men arguing loudly before they started shooting at one another, hitting bystanders.

Around 40,000 people died from various firearms-related incidents, including suicides and homicides, in 2017 in the US, according to government figures.



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Nightclub shooting victim had just reapplied for old job


Raeven Parks, 25, had just reapplied for her old job at an Overland Park call center last week. She drove through snow and ice to find out if she could have the role she left just a few months earlier to take care of some personal matters. She was dedicated to getting back to work.Four days later, Parks was shot to death outside the 9ine Ultra Lounge in Kansas City in a mass shooting at a party celebrating the Kansas City Chiefs’ AFC championship win.Employees at Mainspring Management are trying to piece together what happened, and remember the potential she showed. “I was going to approve her, definitely, yes, 100%,” said Mainspring Management supervisor Alónzo Robinson.Robinson said he received a text message from Parks just hours after she came in to apply last Thursday.“I really appreciate it,” Parks said in the message. “I really need this second chance, please let me know.”Robinson said he hoped to have an answer by Monday. He said he never got to give her the good news.“She was all about joy and making people laugh,” he said. “When she was there, that’s the energy that she brought into that environment.”Parks died after Jahron Swift, 29, opened fire on a crowd of people standing outside the 9ine Ultra Lounge. A private security guard shot and killed Swift.Robinson said he was heartbroken to hear the news about his former co-worker.He sent her a text message the day after the shooting.“You’re truly loved, we will all miss you,” the message said. “I am so heartbroken right now, and I love you.”

KANSAS CITY, Mo. —

Raeven Parks, 25, had just reapplied for her old job at an Overland Park call center last week. She drove through snow and ice to find out if she could have the role she left just a few months earlier to take care of some personal matters.

She was dedicated to getting back to work.

Four days later, Parks was shot to death outside the 9ine Ultra Lounge in Kansas City in a mass shooting at a party celebrating the Kansas City Chiefs’ AFC championship win.

Employees at Mainspring Management are trying to piece together what happened, and remember the potential she showed.

“I was going to approve her, definitely, yes, 100%,” said Mainspring Management supervisor Alónzo Robinson.

Robinson said he received a text message from Parks just hours after she came in to apply last Thursday.

“I really appreciate it,” Parks said in the message. “I really need this second chance, please let me know.”

Robinson said he hoped to have an answer by Monday. He said he never got to give her the good news.

“She was all about joy and making people laugh,” he said. “When she was there, that’s the energy that she brought into that environment.”

Parks died after Jahron Swift, 29, opened fire on a crowd of people standing outside the 9ine Ultra Lounge. A private security guard shot and killed Swift.

Robinson said he was heartbroken to hear the news about his former co-worker.

He sent her a text message the day after the shooting.

“You’re truly loved, we will all miss you,” the message said. “I am so heartbroken right now, and I love you.”



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