Categories
News

Ban traumatic ‘shooter drills’ in US schools, urge teachers | US news


“Shooter drills”, in which masked men carrying assault rifles burst into classrooms and simulate real-life gun attacks, are traumatising children and should be banned, America’s two biggest teachers’ unions have warned.

The drills came in after the Columbine shooting in 1999, where 13 students were killed, but they have surged in American schools since the attack at Sandy Hook school in 2012, when a gunman shot dead 26, mostly children in kindergarten.

“You have kids wetting their pants, you have kids crying, you have teachers crying and you have everyone saying, ‘this is it – I’m going to die’,” said Lily Eskelsen García, president of the National Education Association. “And when it’s over, it’s like – just kidding!”

Talking to children about where to hide in the event of an intruder is one thing, but the graphic nature of the mock-ups is putting children and teachers in “the most frightening situations”, Eskelsen García said.

Teachers are shot at with pellet guns and children as young as five are made to cower silently under desks, while others are asked to lie down in hallways covered in fake blood.

For teacher Abbey Clements, a survivor of Sandy Hook, putting children through terrifying “active shooter” situations – and making them think they are real – is “obscene and perverse”.

An active shooter drill at Park High Schoolin Livingston, Montana. Photograph: William Campbell/Corbis via Getty Images

“How can you possibly plan for all the different horrific ways people can carry out these mass shootings?”There are common sense things that we can do, she said, “but to make children and teachers go through these potentially harmful drills in the name of safety is just ludicrous”.

Now, the NET has joined forces with the American Federation of Teachers and a leading gun-control advocacy group, Everytown for Gun Safety, to say enough is enough.

They are calling for an end to what they call “extreme shooter drills”, saying they leave children traumatised, unable to focus in class, and unable even to sleep at night. In some cases, teachers have been physically wounded, said Eskelsen García.

Today, 95% of schools are practising shooter and lockdown drills in one form or another. Some states, such as Florida, have passed laws making them mandatory.

In their wake, says Eskelsen García, a $2.7bn industry has grown up as private companies swoop in to offer their safety training services. “Hire us and we’ll organise safety for your school, they say – but they’re preying on the anguish of parents and school staff and the desperate feeling that we must ‘do something’,” she said.

But Jean-Paul Guilbault, chief executive of the Alice Training Institute, a company that runs shooter drills, insisted they don’t fuel fear. “Our children are living in it, they see it all around them on the news, they go to school every day and they are worried about it,” he said.

His company claims to have a methodology that could save people’s lives in “the two minutes 20 seconds from when a shot goes off to when the first responders arrive”.

Drills did need to be age-appropriate, he said. “But when that alarm goes off, when the panic button is pushed, people should know how to secure a room.”

Shannon Watts, founder of Moms Demand Action for Gun Sense in America (part of Everytown) believes active shooter drills are deflecting from the real issue in America, of easy access to guns. “Whenever there’s a mass shooting, the gun lobby argues that schools need to be arming teachers and increasing the number of shooter drills,” she said. “But children are much safer in schools than they are in their homes.”

Almost five million American children live in homes with unlocked, loaded guns. The focus needs to be on addressing gun violence “before it ever gets to our schools”, she said.

Clements understands that parents are afraid for their children whenever the unthinkable happens – whether it’s at a school, a cinema or, a shopping mall. “It’s a difficult situation for the schools,” she said, “because parents are demanding to know ‘what are you doing to keep my kids safe?’.”

But she is adamant that no one could have done anything differently at Sandy Hook. “In a real situation, you have no idea where the shooting is coming from”, she said. “There’s no right or wrong thing to do – you go on instinct.”



Source link

Categories
News

Molson Coors mass shooting gunman accused of punching woman, gun crime in 1990s | Crime


On the job

×

You have run out of free articles. You can support our newsroom by joining at our lowest rate!

Thanks for being a subscriber.
Sorry, your subscription does not include this content.

Please call 800-362-8333 to upgrade your subscription.

×

Thanks for visiting!

Please sign up or log in to view more. No credit card required.

While police have said nothing about Ferrill’s motive, a neighbor, Erna Roenspies, told The Associated Press that at one point he told her he was upset at “spies” from the brewery. He told her the “spies” were checking up on him to make sure a shoulder injury suffered at work — most likely his rotator cuff tear — was legitimate. Molson Coors did not respond to a message seeking comment.

Companies sometimes do carry out such surveillance. Miller Brewing Co., now part of Molson Coors, hired outside investigators to watch an employee in Ohio over a disputed foot injury in 2000. The employee sued Miller for a variety of claims, including a retaliation claim for the surveillance, but none of the claims succeeded.

More details emerged Friday about what exactly unfolded at the brewery. Byron Johnson, a brewery employee who works in fermentation, said a last-minute decision may have kept him from walking into the gunfire.

“I was coming from lunch and decided to instead of taking the normal route to the break area, I decided to use that time to pick up some work gloves,” said Johnson.

He came back from picking up the gloves and entered Building 4 through the back door about 1:45 p.m.


“About five minutes later a co-worker comes in and says someone had an open wound on the first floor,” Johnson said, adding that the co-worker didn’t appear shaken. “They were concerned. That’s what threw me off. Then a sanitation woman came in about 10 minutes later, shaken up and out of breath and really nervous,” he said.



Source link

Categories
News

Yet Another Mass Shooter Was a Military Veteran


Thursday yet another mass shooting was committed by a military veteran, this one in Milwaukee. Virtually all military veterans are not mass shooters. Many peace activists are veterans. Many everything under the sun are veterans. But mass shooters are very disproportionately military veterans.

Some mass shooters who are not veterans are acting out a pretense of being in the military and/or are using military weapons. Militarism impacts a society in many ways. But one of them is through the violence of veterans, people who have been trained and conditioned to engage in violence but not always guided successfully into nonviolent post-military life.

Among males aged 18-59 in the United States, 15% are veterans.

Among male mass-shooters aged 18-59 in the United States, 36% are veterans.

A mass shooter is well over twice as likely to be a veteran.

Were this statistic discovered with regard to any unrelated demographic feature, such as red hair or Hinduism, it would be huge news and a topic of intense widespread research. Yet, when it’s discovered that people who’ve been trained and conditioned to kill are more likely to kill (as obvious a connection as one might imagine) nobody cares.

Mother Jones magazine maintains a list of mass shootings here. I’ve modified it here. I’ve modified it in the following ways. I’ve added a column for veteran status. I’ve removed shootings by women or by men outside the age range that makes the statistical comparison possible. I’ve removed a shooting by a foreign-born shooter who could not have joined the U.S. military. This has reduced the list from 118 shootings to 103.

I have not counted as veterans shooters who had been security guards or prison guards unless they were in the military. I have not counted as veterans shooters who were on record describing their future crime in explicitly military terms as if participating in and referencing by name the U.S. military, unless I could determine that they had actually been in the U.S. military. I have not counted as veterans two men who tried to join the U.S. military and were rejected. I have not counted as a veteran one man who worked at a U.S. Navy base as a civilian. I have not counted as a veteran a man who attacked two military locations, despite the obvious role of the military in the crime.

For many of the shooters, I have not been able to determine veteran status one way or another — I have not counted any of those shooters as veterans.

I have included as veterans those trained by ROTC, whether or not they continued in the military beyond that. I have included one man who was a member of the Saudi military being trained by the U.S. military in the United States when he committed his crime.

If people trained and conditioned and given experience burning down buildings were found to be burning down buildings, I think someone would care.

Mother Jones is interested in the gender of the shooters, in their mental health history, and various other factors. None of these factors is a complete explanation of anything, any more or less than veteran status is. Yet they are of interest.

The problem in trying to interest people in the veteran factor, no doubt, is the war culture and the troop propaganda that engulfs the United States. These are reasons for the work of World BEYOND War, including something else that’s now in Milwaukee, namely this billboard:



Source link

Categories
News

Bucks hold moment of silence for Molson Coors mass shooting victims


The Milwaukee Bucks held a moment of silence before Friday’s game to honor the employees and victims of the Molson Coors mass shooting. Fiserv Forum was sold out for the game against the Oklahoma City Thunder. It was the first game since the Molson Coors mass shooting and the first opportunity for the city of Milwaukee to gather together. “It’s kind of surreal and sad, but yet I’m happy to be out with everybody and be Milwaukee strong. Miller strong,” said Andy Jensen from Oak Creek.”It’s great that the city is able to come together after something like that. Especially to enjoy something like this,” said Elton Rogers from Port Washington. The Bucks beat the Thunder 133-86.

MILWAUKEE —

The Milwaukee Bucks held a moment of silence before Friday’s game to honor the employees and victims of the Molson Coors mass shooting.

Fiserv Forum was sold out for the game against the Oklahoma City Thunder.

It was the first game since the Molson Coors mass shooting and the first opportunity for the city of Milwaukee to gather together.

“It’s kind of surreal and sad, but yet I’m happy to be out with everybody and be Milwaukee strong. Miller strong,” said Andy Jensen from Oak Creek.

“It’s great that the city is able to come together after something like that. Especially to enjoy something like this,” said Elton Rogers from Port Washington.

The Bucks beat the Thunder 133-86.



Source link

Categories
News

Mass Killings Database: Workplace Shootings Remain Rare


The mass shooting at a brewery in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, was the 13th in the U.S. since 2006. Workplace mass shootings remain a rare event but there are some trends among who carries them out and why.

The Associated Press/USA TODAY/Northeastern University Mass Killings database tracks all U.S. homicides since 2006 involving four or more people killed, not including the offender, over 24 hours regardless of weapon, location, victim-offender relationship or motive.

Before Wednesday’s shooting at the sprawling Molson Coors plant in Milwaukee, there had been three mass shootings in the United States in 2020 and none of those had taken place at the workplace. In 2019, there were two workplace mass shootings.

Here are some of the key findings from the AP/USA Today/Northeastern database on workplace shootings:

THE PERPETRATORS:

All but one of the shooters was a man. The lone exception was in 2006 when 44-year-old Jennifer San Marco, a former postal worker with a history of mental illness, shot and killed a neighbor before traveling to the postal facility and killing six employees. She then killed herself.

The youngest was 25 while the oldest 60. Most were in their 30s or 40s. About a third were black while the rest were white.

About half of them died by suicide.

THE WEAPONS

All of the workplace shootings were carried out using handguns. In one case, 34-year-old Aaron Alexis used both a handgun and a shotgun to kill 12 and injure eight in an office building at the Washington Navy Yard in 2013. The former Navy reservist was killed by police. Alexis worked for a base subcontractor.

THE REASONS

In about half of the cases, the perpetrator had either been fired or reprimanded. In the other cases, the apparent reasons varied, with a history of mental illness being present about a quarter of the time. In at least one case — the mass shooting at a government building in Virginia Beach, Virginia, last year — authorities remain uncertain what set off the gunman.

Workplace shootings of course predate the database.

In one of the most memorable earliest workplace shootings, a 47-year-old pressman on medical leave due to psychological issues killed eight people and injured 12 before killing himself at Standard Gravure, a printing plant in Kentucky, in 1989.

The 1990s were marked by mass shootings at Chuck E. Cheese in Aurora, Colorado, where a fired employee shot and killed four workers in 1993. Later that decade, in 1999, a fired day trader killed 12 people and injured more than 13 at his home and then at two day trading offices in Atlanta. He then killed himself.

WORKPLACE LOCATION

In about a quarter of the shootings, the workplace was a government building, while the rest were carried out at commercial businesses.



Source link

Categories
News

‘It’s heartbreaking. It’s devastating,’ Ryan Braun says about mass shooting


‘It’s heartbreaking. It’s devastating,’ Ryan Braun says about mass shooting

Ryan Braun says it’s too bad the team can’t be in Milwaukee right now to make a greater impact

Updated: 7:40 PM CST Feb 27, 2020

Hide Transcript
Show Transcript

TOLD ME IT SENT SHOCKWAVES THROUGHOUT THE CLUBHOUSE. WE ARE WHERE YOU YESTERDAY WHEN YOU FOUND OUT THE NEWS ABOUT WHAT HAPPENED IN MILWAUKEE? MY MOM SENT ME THE LINK TO WHAT HAPPENED. I WAS ON THE WAY HOME. IT IS HEARTBREAKING, DEVASTATING, TERRIBLE, BUT WE ARE CONSTANTLY READING HEADLINES LIKE THIS. WE ARE ALL SIGNIFICANTLY IMPACTED, BUT NOT THE WAY THOSE IN MILWAUKEE ARE RIGHT NOW. STEPHEN: DO YOU GET A SENSE THAT IT HAS ROCKED YOU GUYS A LITTLE BIT EMOTIONALLY? >> ABSOLUTELY. IT HAS BEEN A HUGE TOPIC OF CONVERSATION TODAY. WHAT CAN WE DO TO HELP, NOT ONLY THE VICTIMS IN THE AFTERMATH, BUT HELP PEOPLE AVOID GETTING TO A PLACE WHERE THESE THINGS HAPPEN. STEPHEN: WE ARE BACK LIVE IN PHOENIX. THAT BANNER WILL REMAIN IN THE DUGOUT HERE FOR THE REST OF SPRING TRAINING. CRAIG COUNSELL SPOKE WITH THE TEAM, AND HE SAID THERE WAS AN “WAKE-UP CALL FOR ME. I KNOW I HAVE TO DO MY PART, WE ALL HAVE TO DO OUR PART SO THIS DOES NOT HAPPEN AGAIN.

‘It’s heartbreaking. It’s devastating,’ Ryan Braun says about mass shooting

Ryan Braun says it’s too bad the team can’t be in Milwaukee right now to make a greater impact

Updated: 7:40 PM CST Feb 27, 2020



Source link

Categories
News

T-shirt maker shows support for mass shooting victims – WKRG News 5


YADKINVILLE, N.C. (WJHL)- Thursday night, News Channel 11 traveled to Yadkinville, North Carolina to speak with a KFC employee that reported a possible sighting of 15-month-old Evelyn Boswell to authorities.

According to Ashley Hutchens, she was working at the front counter at the KFC in town when three people came in: a man, woman, and young girl.



Source link

Categories
News

Medical expert questioned over Fox Hill mass shooting injuries – EyeWitness News


NASSAU, BAHAMAS – One of the survivors of the 2013 Fox Hill mass shooting sustained gunshot injuries to her left thigh, chest and both breasts, just nearly avoiding any vital organs, according to a medical expert.

Jermaine Curry, Peter Rolle and Justin Williams are accused of murdering Claudezino Davis, Shaquille Demeritte, Eric Morrison and Shenique Sands on December 27, 2013.

The trio has also been charged for the attempted murder of Chino Davis, Janet Davis, John Davis, Benjamin Demeritte, Samuel Ferguson, Jermaine Pratt and Leroy Taylor, on the same day.

Testifying before Supreme Court Justice Fraser, Dr. Justin Albury told the court that on the day of the incident he treated Janet Davis’ “life threatening injuries”.

Albury said while the injuries were serious, Davis’ thoracic cavity was not undermined, with no injury to her chest wall where vital organs were.

He told the court that had it not been for the medical treatment Davis could have possibly died.

The defense objected multiple times to the Crown’s line of questioning, insisting that certain questions put forth to Albury were impermissible to ask in front of the jury.

The defense also claimed that the witness was giving evidence for which there had been no disclosure.

During cross examination, Albury was asked to confirmed that he filled out parts a Royal Bahamas Police Force hospital form for the patient, but did not know who wrote the other parts of the document.

When asked about a specific notation on that document indicating that the injuries were “not likely” to result in death, there was a continuous back and forth between the family medicine expert and the defense counsel.

Albury maintained that Davis had life threatening injuries in terms of her prognosis of death, and was treated to ensure there was no loss of life.

Curry is being represented by attorney Murrio Ducille, Rolle is represented by Sonia Timothy, and Williams is represented by Geoffrey Farquharson.



Source link

Categories
News

Cheron Shelton, Found Not Guilty In Wilkinsburg Mass Shooting Trial, Charged With Illegally Possessing Rife, Ammunition – CBS Pittsburgh


WILKINSBURG, Pa. (KDKA) — The man found not guilty in the Wilkinsburg mass shooting trial has been charged with illegally possessing a rifle and ammunition.

The Department of Justice announced Cheron Shelton was indicted by a federal grand jury on a charge of violating federal firearms laws, announced Tuesday.

The indictment says on March 12, 2016, that Shelton possed a Colt Model M4, a .22 caliber rifle, knowing that he had been previously convicted of a crime.

When reached for comment, the DA’s office said:

“The defendant is classified as a felon not to possess a weapon and the charge is appropriate.”

(Source: Allegheny County)

Shelton was the lone defendant accused of killing five people and an unborn baby at a cookout in Wilkinsburg on March 9, 2016.

The jury was tasked with deciding if Shelton was innocent or guilty of first-degree murder or third-degree murder.

He was found not guilty on Feb. 14.

During that trial, evidence of a rifle did come up in testimony.

Attorneys talked about the weapon, which investigators found at Cheron Shelton’s mother’s house. Investigators also swabbed for fingerprints and confirmed that one of Shelton’s fingerprints was discovered on that weapon.

(Photo Credit: KDKA)

RELATED STORIES:

KDKA’s Meghan Schiller asked about the timing of this federal grand jury indicement.

She asked did it happen immediately after the trial?

She was told “no comment.”

Chelton is currently in the Allegheny County Jail on other charges.



Source link

Categories
News

What Forgiveness Means Nearly 5 Years After Emanuel AME Church Mass Shooting


This year will mark the 5th anniversary of the tragic death of nine black churchgoers at Emanuel African Methodist Episcopal Church in Charleston, South Carolina, at the hands of white supremacist Dylan Roof.

Nearly half a decade later, hate crimes are on the rise across the country, and South Carolina is one of only four states without any hate crime legislation.

As the state grapples with how to stop hate-motivated violence, the church and grieving family members seek to heal through the radical act of forgiveness.

Chris Singleton, the son of Emmanuel AME church shooting victim Sharonda Coleman Singleton, at his home in Hanahan, South Carolina. (Alvin C. Jacobs for Here & Now)Regena Thomas. (Ciku Theuri/Here & Now)In 2015, nine black Americans were shot and killed at Emanuel AME church in Charleston, South Carolina. (Ciku Theuri/Here & Now)In 2015, nine black Americans were shot and killed at Emanuel AME church in Charleston, South Carolina. (Ciku Theuri/Here & Now)In 2015, nine black Americans were shot and killed at Emanuel AME church in Charleston, South Carolina. (Ciku Theuri/Here & Now)



Source link