Louisville mass shooting survivor dedicates herself to fighting gun violence - Mass Shooting News

Louisville mass shooting survivor dedicates herself to fighting gun violence


Whitney Austin was on a conference call, walking in to the Fifth Third Bank in downtown Cincinnati last fall, when she was shot multiple times.”I just thought, ‘I have to get home to my family, I have to get home to my children,'” Austin remembered thinking after being shot.It’s exactly what Austin shouted to a nearby police officer who would ultimately pull her to safety. A gunman had opened firing in the lobby, killing three people. Austin, shot 12 times, survived. In the days that followed, she created Whitney Strong—a nonprofit dedicated to fighting gun violence.”I’m going to spend every day moving forward trying to pay back that miracle that was granted to me because who gets that chance? Barely anyone. So I recognize how lucky I am,” Austin told WLKY.She has traveled to Washington, D.C., to meet with lawmakers and she’s working with fellow survivors, while educating others on how to survive and save a life through tourniquet trainings. The Whitney Strong organization has three main goals, according to Austin: suicide prevention, preventing prohibited persons from gaining access to firearms and getting extreme risk protection orders for Kentucky and Ohio.While she has garnered national attention, she says her biggest fans are her husband and two young children.”They’ll tell you, ‘Mommy works on teaching people how to use tourniquet,’ and, ‘Mommy works on preventing gun violence,’ so they get it and they’re supportive. They think it’s cool. Mommy’s Whitney Strong.”Austin says she is proudest of being a mother. She recently announced she would be ending her career with Fifth Third Bank to focus more on family and her foundation. “If I ever want to for a second forget this happened to me, all I need to do is look at my body. Those (the scars) are things that will be with me forever, that will continue to drive me to fight this,” she said, adding, “I don’t want this to happen to people I love. I don’t want this to happen to people I don’t know. It’s an extremely traumatic situation and I want to help others avoid it at all costs.”A fundraiser has been planned for Sept. 6, the one-year anniversary of the shooting, at the Ali Center.To learn more about Whitney Strong or make a donation, visit WhitneyStrong.org.

LOUISVILLE, Ky. —

Whitney Austin was on a conference call, walking in to the Fifth Third Bank in downtown Cincinnati last fall, when she was shot multiple times.

“I just thought, ‘I have to get home to my family, I have to get home to my children,'” Austin remembered thinking after being shot.

It’s exactly what Austin shouted to a nearby police officer who would ultimately pull her to safety. A gunman had opened firing in the lobby, killing three people.

Austin, shot 12 times, survived. In the days that followed, she created Whitney Strong—a nonprofit dedicated to fighting gun violence.

“I’m going to spend every day moving forward trying to pay back that miracle that was granted to me because who gets that chance? Barely anyone. So I recognize how lucky I am,” Austin told WLKY.

She has traveled to Washington, D.C., to meet with lawmakers and she’s working with fellow survivors, while educating others on how to survive and save a life through tourniquet trainings.

The Whitney Strong organization has three main goals, according to Austin: suicide prevention, preventing prohibited persons from gaining access to firearms and getting extreme risk protection orders for Kentucky and Ohio.

While she has garnered national attention, she says her biggest fans are her husband and two young children.

“They’ll tell you, ‘Mommy works on teaching people how to use tourniquet,’ and, ‘Mommy works on preventing gun violence,’ so they get it and they’re supportive. They think it’s cool. Mommy’s Whitney Strong.”

Austin says she is proudest of being a mother. She recently announced she would be ending her career with Fifth Third Bank to focus more on family and her foundation.

“If I ever want to for a second forget this happened to me, all I need to do is look at my body. Those (the scars) are things that will be with me forever, that will continue to drive me to fight this,” she said, adding, “I don’t want this to happen to people I love. I don’t want this to happen to people I don’t know. It’s an extremely traumatic situation and I want to help others avoid it at all costs.”

A fundraiser has been planned for Sept. 6, the one-year anniversary of the shooting, at the Ali Center.

To learn more about Whitney Strong or make a donation, visit WhitneyStrong.org.

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